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Chronicles of Brazil

Perhaps coincidentally, diplomats feature prominently among writers from 'emerging' countries such as Brazil and India. Yet unlike, say, Vikas Swarup's 'Q & A' (better known through its movie adaptation 'Slumdog Millionaire'), Edgard Telles Ribeiro's recent novel 'His Own Man' (first published in Portuguese in 2010, and translated into English in 2014) does not let the -- often messy -- politics fade into the background of a human-interest story. 'His Own Man', writes BRB reviewer Julian Murphy, sometimes reads like a personal effort at coming to grips with how a country and a people can rapidly change its leaders and its values, yet calling the book a 'personal' account would do the book a disservice: It is also undoubtedly a contribution to a public record of a dark era -- between 1960 and ca. 1985 -- of South America's history.

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Welcome to The Berlin Review of Books

The Berlin Review of Books aims to publish high-quality reviews of, and insightful essays based on, important recent books published in any language, with a focus on non-fiction. While it will often approach contemporary debates from a European perspective, it is open to intelligent contributions from around the globe. Our goal is to promote honest and knowledgeable debate of issues of real significance; for this reason, we are committed to financial and editorial independence. The Berlin Review of Books does not normally publish fiction or poetry, except by invitation.

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