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Life, ‘Technics’, and the Decline of the West

With the unexpected resurgence of 'völkisch' thinking in German politics in recent months, and a concomitant revival of the old antagonism between 'culture' and 'civilisation', it may be high time to re-examine the philosophical sources of such thinking. The recent reissue of Oswald Spengler's 'Man and Technics' (first published in 1932 as 'Der Mensch und die Technik') is a good occasion to reflect not only on Spengler's dark vision of history and life, but also on the celebration of martial heroism, which -- in the age of weaponized populism and American-style 'Trumpism' -- seems once again so eerily familiar. 'Man and Technics', argues BRB reviewer Ian James Kidd, has many things in common with Spengler's more well-known 'The Decline of the West' –- its brooding character, grand ambition, and agonistic vision of life. But there is also, underneath that, something different. For, only when the depth of ‘technics’ is properly grasped can the ‘soul of man’ be set free -- or so Spengler suggests in his plea for a genuine ‘philosophy of life’, fuelled by the release of vast energies and power. 'Man and Technics' describes a restlessly stirring ‘will-to-power’ that ‘embraces the world’ in the ‘gigantic power of its technical processes’. Sleepless factories, roaring furnaces, tireless production lines –- all of these show the on-going manifestation of ‘technics’, the dynamic, agonistic force that Spengler conceived as a metaphysical force. There is, then, in 'Man and Technics', a rich (if deeply problematic) resonance with deeper currents in German intellectual history, including those that aligned themselves with the most reactionary and destructive political forces. Engaging with these tendencies, without thereby endorsing them, may be unavoidable, lest ignorance of the technological mediation of political hubris breed intellectual complacency.

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Welcome to The Berlin Review of Books

The Berlin Review of Books aims to publish high-quality reviews of, and insightful essays based on, important recent books published in any language, with a focus on non-fiction. While it will often approach contemporary debates from a European perspective, it is open to intelligent contributions from around the globe. Our goal is to promote honest and knowledgeable debate of issues of real significance; for this reason, we are committed to financial and editorial independence. The Berlin Review of Books does not normally publish fiction or poetry, except by invitation.

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