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Archive for March, 2018

Essay Review: Greening Berlin

In his book ‘Greening Berlin’ (2013), Jens Lachmund contributes to the growing genre of the social studies of environmental science and governance. Focusing on Berlin’s biotope-protection policy, Lachmund’s work provides an analysis of the co-emerging of ecology and urban environmental planning. Lachmund’s presentation of empirical material and context as well as his line or argument are certainly compatible with his objective to demonstrate the co-production of science, politics and urban nature. Yet, as BRB reviewers Ingmar Lippert and Josefine Raasch argue in this essay, review Lachmund’s approach is not uncontroversial and without problems. For one, conflict seems rather marginal in Lachmund’s analysis of the production of environmental information. His analysis focuses on the version of greening that wins. Another criticism relates to the tension emerging from Lachmann tendency to write himself out of the text and the very real need to reflect on his own knowledge production. Yet, all in all, Lachmund presents a comprehensive and ‘systematic analysis of the development of urban nature conservation in one German city’, Berlin — one that has played a cetral role in constituting environmentalist publics and attempting to deal with the way in which city, humans, and nature co-constitute each other.